Doylestown: Nature Lover's Virtual Book Club

The Bucks County Audubon Society at the Honey Hollow Educational Environmental Center welcomes you to join us at the Doylestown Bookshop for a fun and engaging discussion about all things nature. We will be meeting the 4th Thursday evening of the month, starting at 6:00 p.m. We welcome your insights and input for future readings. Bring a friend and make a new one and we look forward to seeing you at the next meeting. Visit our blog for more info: http://natureloversbookclub.blogspot.com/
 
THIS BOOK CLUB WILL BE MEETING VIRTUALLY, HERE ARE THE DETAILS:

Join Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/598607317

Meeting ID: 598 607 317

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Meeting ID: 598 607 317

Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/abR51eyxDx


Meeting: Thursday, April 23rd at 6:00 pm

Discussing: The Songs of Trees by David George Haskell


to be determined The author of the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Forest Unseen visits with nature’s most magnificent networkers — trees 
 
“Both a love song to trees, an exploration of their biology, and a wonderfully philosophical analysis of their role they play in human history and in modern culture.” – Science Friday
 
WINNER OF THE 2018 JOHN BURROUGHS MEDAL FOR OUTSTANDING NATURAL HISTORY WRITING

David Haskell has won acclaim for eloquent writing and deep engagement with the natural world. Now, he brings his powers of observation to the biological networks that surround all species, including humans. Haskell repeatedly visits a dozen trees, exploring  connections with people, microbes, fungi, and other plants and animals. He takes us to  trees in cities (from Manhattan to Jerusalem), forests (Amazonian, North American, and boreal) and areas on the front lines of environmental change (eroding coastlines, burned mountainsides, and war zones.)  In each place he shows how human history, ecology, and well-being are intimately intertwined with the lives of trees.
 
Scientific, lyrical, and contemplative, Haskell reveals the biological connections that underpin all life.  In a world beset by barriers, he reminds us that life’s substance and beauty emerge from relationship and interdependence.

 

All book club selection are 20% off for Book Club members.

 

 
Upcoming Selections
 
To Be Determined.....